Tour de Francia 2022

El jueves 14 de octubre se desvelará el recorrido del Tour de Francia 2022

Por el camino

INDRE-ET-LOIRE DEPARTMENT (37)

In the Centre-Val de Loire region
Population:  607,760 over 19 cantons and 272 communes.Prefecture: Tours (Pop : 137,000).
Sub-prefectures: Chinon, Loches.
Specialties: Tours candy, épine noire, strawberry liquor, fouace of Touraine, quiche tourangelle, macaron of Cormery, nougat of Tours. Wines of the Loire valley (Vouvray etc...) 
Festivals:  Terres du son in Monts, Années Joué in Joué-les-Tours, Les Journées du potager (Orchard Days) in Villandry, Vilitoire in Tours, Festival of the Horizons in Saint-Avertin, À Tours de Bulle (comics, Tours), Rock in the House. 
Tourist sites:
castles of Langeais, Loches, Gizeux, Montpoupon, Amboise (one of the most visited monuments in France), Chenonceau, Montrésor. Caves of Savonnières. 
Economy: STMicroelectronics, Tours hospital the first employer of the region with some 8,000 staff. 
Sport: Tours FC (National 3), Touraine Basket Club.

Km 1

Km 1: Rochecorbon (Pop: 3 200)
Labelled “small city of character”. Troglodyte town on the banks of the Loire. One of the 8 wine-producing villages (300 ha of vines) of the Vouvray AOC appellation.

Lantern of Rochecorbon
Foundation: 11th century by Lord Robert des Roches
Style: Medieval fortress
Characteristics: The 10-m high rectangular tower is the only vestige of Rochecorbon's fortified castle, abandoned by its owners in the 15th century.
History: The dating of the tower's construction is a matter of debate, the style of the crown being characteristic of the 15th century. Honoré de Balzac wrote about it: "It stands out against a charming landscape".
Special feature: this watchtower could be used as a lantern, whose lights warned the Amboise garrison of the dangers threatening Rochecorbon, but also to guide navigators on the Loire.
Classification: Historical monument in 1840.

Km 4

Km 4: Vouvray (Pop: 3,200)
The village is built partly on a hillside in which many troglodytic houses and wine producers' cellars are nestled. The commune is renowned for its vineyard, which started in the 4th century. It is linked to the foundation of the Marmoutier monastery by Saint Martin in 372. The area around the abbey is covered with vines that produce an exquisite wine. In the 14th century, some of the Vouvray vines belonged to the French crown.

The vineyards of Vouvray
Vineyard created by the monks of the Marmoutier monastery founded in 372 by Saint Martin. During the 14th century, part of the Vouvray vineyard belonged to the kings of France who had these wines served at their table.
The Vouvray AOC was recognised by a decree on 6 September 1936 (it covers 2,200 hectares and includes the communes of Vouvray, Chançay, Noizay, Reugny, Rochecorbon, Sainte-Radegonde-en-Touraine (attached to Tours in 1964), Vernou-sur-Brenne, and part of Parçay-Meslay)

Km 9

Km 9: Vernou-sur-Brenne (Pop: 2,700)
Birthplace of Guy Ignolin, French cyclist born in 1936 and who died in 2011, professional from 1959 to 1967, winner of three stages in the Tour de France (one in 1961 and two in 1963) and two stages in the Tour of Spain in 1963.

Km 27

Km 27: Amboise (Pop: 12,700)
This town is located in the Val de Loire area, a UNESCO World Heritage site. It is one of the 11 wine-producing towns in the Touraine-Amboise AOC area.
Amboise has also inherited an industrial heritage from the end of the 19th century, the know-how of which it still retains today.
Amboise, which hosted a stage of the Tour de l'Avenir in 2017, is also the town of former professional cyclist Franck Boucanville.

Royal Castle of Amboise
Foundation: 11th century for the first building, redesigned in the 15th century by King Charles VIII
Style: medieval fortress that became a Renaissance palace in Gothic style.
Characteristics: the royal dwelling is referred to as International Gothic, to which the Minimes Tower and the Heurtault Tower have been added, as well as the Saint-Hubert chapel. In the gardens, the Naples terrace extends over three belvederes overlooking the Loire.
A little history: Francis I grew up in Amboise and brought the great Leonardo da Vinci from Italy, whom he installed at the Clos Lucé, to which the château is linked by an underground passage.
Current destination: one of the most renowned tourist sites in the Loire Valley
Classification: Historical Monument in 1840.

Château du Clos Lucé
Foundation: fiefdom dependent on the château of Amboise, originally built in 1471
Style: Gothic
Characteristics: pink brick and white stone façade, set in 7 hectares of parkland crossed by the Amasse, a small tributary of the Loire.
History: for three years, the castle was the last residence of the famous Leonardo da Vinci. Inside, you can discover the master's bedroom, his kitchen, the council room, Anne of Brittany's oratory and Margaret of Navarre's bedroom.
Current destination: a place to visit dedicated to the world of Leonardo da Vinci, where you can see 40 models made from the inventor's drawings, as well as 3D animations.
Classification: Historical Monument in 1862.

Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519)
Italian painter, scientist, engineer, inventor, anatomist, sculptor, architect, philosopher and writer born on 15 April 1452 in Vinci in Tuscany and died in 1519 in Amboise. An adept of the new art of chiaroscuro, he perfected his sfumato (misty) technique, which softens contrasts and improves the realism of landscapes and portraits. A genius and science enthusiast, he studied mathematics, animal and human anatomy, and the flight of birds. In all these studies, Leonardo da Vinci followed a rational and rigorous method based on observation. Tireless and eclectic, he drew, as the documents that have come down to us testify, almost everything he encountered, humans, animals, plants, mechanisms, etc. He had the rare privilege of having access to dead human bodies, whose internal anatomy he studied in minute detail. In geometry, he explored new forms. His drawing of the rhombicuboctahedron became famous. In 1515, the battle of Marignano gave the country of Milan to Francis I, who invited Leonardo to France. The following year, the artist moved to Le Clos-Lucé. He aroused the admiration of the king, who bought him the Mona Lisa, and left him free to "do what he wanted". Ill, he died in 1519.

Km 30

KM 30: Pagoda of Chanteloup

Foundation: built on the grounds of the vanished Chanteloup castle between 1775 and 1778 at the request of the Duke of Choiseul, minister of Louis XV
Style: temple dedicated to friendship
Characteristics: culminating at 44 m and with 149 steps, the pagoda has seven floors, each one built "in couple", set back one on top of the other on the principle of the longue-vue. Its summit offers a panoramic view of the Loire Valley.
History: the Duke of Choiseul had this pagoda built as a tribute to the loyalty of those who, defying the king, came to visit him during his disgrace. On the first floor, Choiseul is said to have had the names of his visitors engraved on white marble tables, which were then turned to face the wall.
Current use: a place of visit offering a virtual restitution of the rich hours of the Château de Chanteloup.
Classification: Historical Monument in 1862.

Km 42

Km 42: Chenonceaux (Pop: 350)
The difference in spelling (no "x" when referring to the château) is thought to be due to one of the owners of the building, Louise Dupin, during the Revolution, who wanted to mark her "sympathy" with the new regime, having welcomed many of the philosophers of the Enlightenment there before the events of 1789. By deleting the "x", she would have wanted to concretely recall the royal origins of the castle while pledging allegiance to the republic.

Chenonceau Castle
Foundation: the present castle was built from 1513 to 1521 by Thomas Bohier, Receiver of Finances under Charles VIII, Louis XII and Francis I.
Style: Renaissance
Characteristics: the castle presents an architecture leaning on the Cher, surrounded on 3 sides by ditches of living water and in the corners 4 round towers, the bases bathing in the moat.
A little history: the history of the castle is marked by the women who have owned and built it, hence its nickname of "Château des Dames" (Ladies Castle), from Katherine Briçonnet (architect of the castle and wife of Thomas Bohier) to Diane de Poitiers, Catherine of Médici or Louise of Lorraine, up to Mrs Georges Menier (who managed the military hospital set up in the castle during the First World War), whose family still owns it.
Current destination: 850,000 visitors are welcomed each year, which is the largest number of visitors in France for a private castle.
Classification: Historical Monument in 1840 (castle) and 1962 (park).


DEPARTMENT OF LOIR-ET-CHER (41)
Population: 331,915, spread over 15 cantons and 267 communes.
Prefecture: Blois (Pop: 46,086).
Sub-prefectures: Vendôme, Romorantin-Lanthenay
Specialities: Tarte Tatin (Lamotte-Beuvron), PDO goat cheese (Selles-sur-Cher), PDO wines (Touraine, Cheverny, Coteaux-du-Vendômois).
Festivals: International Garden Festival (Chaumont-sur-Loire), Promenades Photographiques (Vendôme), Rendez-vous de l'Histoire (Blois, October), BD Boum (Blois, November), Jazzin' Cheverny, International Folklore Festival (Montoire-sur-le-Loir), Rockomotives (Vendôme)
Tourist sites: Partly listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, the Loir-et-Cher has four of the most famous châteaux of the Loire: Blois, Chambord, Chaumont-sur-Loire and Cheverny. The Beauval ZooPark, ranked among the four most beautiful zoos in the world, is also one of the department's jewels.
Economy: tourism (including top-of-the-range accommodation, 5 Michelin-starred chefs, etc.), agriculture, winegrowing, precision and high-tech mechanics, logistics transport platforms.
Sport: Marie-Amélie Le Fur (Paralympic champion, 8 medals including 2 gold), Romain Feillu (cycling). Events : ADA Blois Basket 41 (Pro A), Tour de Loir-et-Cher (cycling, April), Blois International Tennis Championships, Game Fair, International Hunting and Nature Fair at the Federal Equestrian Park in Lamotte-Beuvron, Generali Open de France (horse riding).

DEPARTMENT OF LOIR-ET-CHER (41)
Population: 331,915, spread over 15 cantons and 267 communes.
Prefecture: Blois (Pop: 46,086).
Sub-prefectures: Vendôme, Romorantin-Lanthenay
Specialities: Tarte Tatin (Lamotte-Beuvron), PDO goat cheese (Selles-sur-Cher), PDO wines (Touraine, Cheverny, Coteaux-du-Vendômois).
Festivals: International Garden Festival (Chaumont-sur-Loire), Promenades Photographiques (Vendôme), Rendez-vous de l'Histoire (Blois, October), BD Boum (Blois, November), Jazzin' Cheverny, International Folklore Festival (Montoire-sur-le-Loir), Rockomotives (Vendôme)
Tourist sites: Partly listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, the Loir-et-Cher has four of the most famous châteaux of the Loire: Blois, Chambord, Chaumont-sur-Loire and Cheverny. The Beauval ZooPark, ranked among the four most beautiful zoos in the world, is also one of the department's jewels.
Economy: tourism (including top-of-the-range accommodation, 5 Michelin-starred chefs, etc.), agriculture, winegrowing, precision and high-tech mechanics, logistics transport platforms.
Sport: Marie-Amélie Le Fur (Paralympic champion, 8 medals including 2 gold), Romain Feillu (cycling).
Events : ADA Blois Basket 41 (Pro A), Tour de Loir-et-Cher (cycling, April), Blois International Tennis Championships, Game Fair, International Hunting and Nature Fair at the Federal Equestrian Park in Lamotte-Beuvron, Generali Open de France (horse riding).

Km 47

Km 47 : Chissay-en-Touraine (Pop: 1,100)
Part of the small agricultural region Southern bocage plateaux of South Touraine. In June 1940, the Château de la Ménaudière, now a luxury hotel, served as a retreat for the administration of the president of the Council, Paul Reynaud, at the time of the German invasion.

Château de Chissay
Foundation: built in the 15th century under Charles VII for the French treasurer Pierre Bérard, husband of Anne de Ronsard.
Style: castle-fortress
History: in June 1940, in the midst of the debacle, the castle hosted the government of President Paul Reynaud, who had moved to the castle of Cangé, some thirty kilometres away. Political and military conferences were held in the main hall. General Weygand, the British ambassador and ministers passed through Chissay... On 12 June, General De Gaulle arrived in Chissay to present Paul Reynaud with his projects. Chissay had just witnessed the agony of the Third Republic.
Current use: the former royal residence has become a hotel.
Classification: Historical Monument in 1846

Km 50

Km 50: Montrichard (Pop: 3,300)
Formerly a commune, it became the new commune of Montrichard-Val de Cher after the merger with Bourré in 2016.
Medieval town dating from the 11th century. The 12th century keep also has two museums, one on archaeology and one on local history and traditions.
In 2017, a stage of the Tour de l'Avenir started from Montrichard.

Castle of Montrichard
Foundation: 11th century by the Count of Anjou, Fulk III the Black.
Style: medieval fortress
Characteristics: an imposing square keep still dominates the town and remains the only vestige of the castle.
Special feature: the ruins of the castle are now enclosed by a protective wall
Current use: the archaeological museum of the friends of René Galloux (palaeontology, prehistory of man, Molinology, Gallo-Roman and Merovingian periods) and the ethnology museum of the friends of old Montrichard are located here.
Classification: Historical Monument in 1877

Stop me if you can (2002)
American film directed by Steven Spielberg, with Tom Hanks, Leonardo di Caprio, Nathalie Baye and Christopher Walken. Based on true events, the film tells the story of Frank William Abagnale, Jr. (Leonardo Di Caprio), one of America's most famous impostors. In turn an airline pilot, a doctor, a lawyer (he falsified all his degrees), he used forged cheques for a total of 2.5 million dollars. Montrichard plays a key role in the film, as it is in this village that the FBI agent (Tom Hanks) arrests Leonardo di Caprio (his mother, played by Nathalie Baye, was born in Montrichard). Ironically, Steven Spielberg never set foot in Montrichard. In fact, all the shots of the village were taken in Quebec City, on the town's royal square. A few anachronisms emerge from these shots, such as the use of Citroën DS by the National Police, although the latter never used them and Montrichard was more dependent on the Gendarmerie.

Km 58

Km 58: Monthous-sur-Cher (Pop: 970)

Gué-Péan Castle
Foundation: 15th century
Style: Renaissance
Characteristics: four corner towers give the castle its panache. One of them, the Imperial Tower, is an architectural feat of which there are only 13 in Europe.
A special feature: legend has it that its keep was built on a dolmen.
Current destination: the architect of Futuroscope, Denis Laming, took over the property at the turn of the 21st century. He has revived the equestrian activity and opens the monument to the public in summer.
Classification: Historical Monument in 1980.

Km 74

Km 74: Beauval Zooparc
In 1980, Françoise Delord, a presenter of shows on the Bobino music hall stage and a bird lover, opened the Beauval ornithological park, which was home to nearly 2,000 birds. In 1989, the park became the Beauval Zooparc and welcomed its first wild animals and primates. The development of the park, focused on animal welfare, was accompanied by the creation of the Beauval Nature association in 2009. In 2012, a pair of giant pandas, the only representatives of their species in France, settled in the park as part of a research, reproduction and conservation programme in collaboration with the Chengdu base in China.
In 2017, the Zooparc became the first French park, and the fourth in Europe, to successfully breed the giant panda. Today, it is home to nearly 35,000 extraordinary animals and 800 species.

Km 74

Km 74: Seigy (Pop: 1,050)
Seigy is the village where a Gran Fondo, the Nicolas Vogondy, has been organised every year since 2013, sponsored by the local hero. French road champion in 2002 and 2008, and time trial champion in 2010, Nicolas Vogondy took part in the Tour de France seven times between 2001 and 2010, finishing 19th in 2002.

Indre department (36)
Population: 220,595, spread over 13 cantons and 241 communes.
Prefecture: Châteauroux (Pop : 43,400).
Sub-prefectures: Le Blanc, La Châtre, Issoudun.
Surface area: 6,791 m².
Specialities: pâté berrichon, potato galette, œufs à la couille d'âne (eggs poached in red wine), poirat (pears and pepper cooked in a pie), tarte aux barriaux (Berrichonne speciality with black plums), cream of green lentils from Berry with truffles, carp fries (speciality with carp from Brenne), black chicken from Berry, Reuilly wines, Valençay wines, cheeses (pyramid of Valençay, pyramid of Pouligny-Saint-Pierre)
Festivals: International Stage-Festival DARC (Dance, Art, Rhythm, Culture), Le Son Continu Festival. Harp Festival of Gargilesse. Pentecost Festival in Berry at La Grange aux Pianos, Chassignolles, Festival de la Prée at Ségry.
Tourist sites: Maison Jour de fête-Jacques Tati, Argentomagus Museum, Saint-Roch Museum, Haute Touche Reserve, Brenne Nature Park, Nohant - George Sand's House, Valençay Castle, Lower-Berry train in Ecueillé, Poulaines Gardens, Bouges Castle, Notre-Dame de Déols Abbey, Brenne Nature Park, Haute Touche Reserve, Saint-Vincent. de la Haute Touche, Saint-Valentin (the lovers' village), Saint-Roch hospice museum in Issoudun,
Economy: Development of SMEs in niche markets: Vigean oil mills, Noiseraie Production, PDO cheeses / PDO wines / Label Rouge for the Lentille verte du Berry, Home and building equipment: Balsan, France Parquet Production Innovation (FPPI), AMCC, Beirens... Logistics and transport, national platforms with notably the Vivarte group. Establishment or maintenance of large companies: Louis Vuitton (leather goods and luggage), Bodin Joyeux and Maroquinerie Rioland (high-end leather goods)
Sport: La Berrichonne Football in Chateauroux, Basketball; National 1 and National 3 teams at Le Poinçonnet, CNTS Shooting Club, Maison départementale des sports. The leisure centres of Ligny, Eguzon and the Bellebouche lake and the Belle-Isle lake offer water sports and leisure activities.
Websites: www.indre.fr / www.berryprovince.com / www.indreberry.fr / https://www.facebook.com/IndreenBerry/ / Twitter @Indre36 / https://www.instagram.com/indre36/


Indre in Berry, a natural department!
Located in the centre of France, in the heart of Berry, the department of Indre, through which flows the river that gives it its name, provides a gradual transition from the Loire Valley to the foothills of the Massif Central.
Indre has a preserved environment, a rich past, land and perpetuated traditions that enchant its visitors. Peaceful and wild, medieval and romantic, a land of nuances and contrasts, Indre remains an endearing, often secretive country. With more than 80 Romanesque churches, 100 castles and houses from the medieval period, thousands of kilometres of signposted footpaths, a regional nature park..., let yourself be guided on this quick stroll through the 6 landscapes of the Indre.
The Pays de Valençay - Boischaut Nord: a land of hedged farmland bordering Touraine, which experienced the splendours of Napoleonic diplomacy, around the sumptuous castle of the Prince of Talleyrand in Valençay (Renaissance). With Bouges (18th century - replica of the Petit Trianon) and Argy, it forms the "golden triangle" of the department's castles. A fine goat's cheese with the appearance of a pyramid, and a vineyard crown Valençay with a double AOC.
The Issoudun and Champagne Berrichonne region: the large cereal plains of the Champagne Berrichonne region hide a few treasures: the light and fruity wines of Reuilly (AOC), the green lentils of Berry and the former royal town of Issoudun with its magnificent Saint-Roch hospice or its Tour Blanche.
The La Châtre en Berry region: the spirit of romance has been blowing through this peaceful bocage country in the south of the Indre since the 19th century. In Nohant, George Sand lived and received Balzac, Chopin, Delacroix, Liszt, Flaubert.
The Val de Creuse - Val d'Anglin region: from Crozant to Tournon-Saint-Martin, spectacular landscapes that inspired great impressionists such as Monet and Guillaumin. Here, outdoor leisure activities reign around the Anglin, the Creuse or the Éguzon lake (300 ha).
The Brenne regional nature park: it is known as the land of a thousand ponds. Hunting, fish farming and pond fishing, and extensive livestock farming continue to keep the Brenne alive. It is also a paradise for lovers of ornithology, fauna and flora: orchids, dragonflies, migratory birds, and even a small freshwater turtle, the cistude.
The Castelroussin - Val de l'Indre region: Châteauroux, a green, dynamic, lively city with a preserved heritage, a city on a human scale.

Indre department (36)
Population: 220,595, spread over 13 cantons and 241 communes.
Prefecture: Châteauroux (Pop : 43,400).
Sub-prefectures: Le Blanc, La Châtre, Issoudun.
Surface area: 6,791 m².
Specialities: pâté berrichon, potato galette, œufs à la couille d'âne (eggs poached in red wine), poirat (pears and pepper cooked in a pie), tarte aux barriaux (Berrichonne speciality with black plums), cream of green lentils from Berry with truffles, carp fries (speciality with carp from Brenne), black chicken from Berry, Reuilly wines, Valençay wines, cheeses (pyramid of Valençay, pyramid of Pouligny-Saint-Pierre)
Festivals: International Stage-Festival DARC (Dance, Art, Rhythm, Culture), Le Son Continu Festival. Harp Festival of Gargilesse. Pentecost Festival in Berry at La Grange aux Pianos, Chassignolles, Festival de la Prée at Ségry.
Tourist sites: Maison Jour de fête-Jacques Tati, Argentomagus Museum, Saint-Roch Museum, Haute Touche Reserve, Brenne Nature Park, Nohant - George Sand's House, Valençay Castle, Lower-Berry train in Ecueillé, Poulaines Gardens, Bouges Castle, Notre-Dame de Déols Abbey, Brenne Nature Park, Haute Touche Reserve, Saint-Vincent. de la Haute Touche, Saint-Valentin (the lovers' village), Saint-Roch hospice museum in Issoudun,
Economy: Development of SMEs in niche markets: Vigean oil mills, Noiseraie Production, PDO cheeses / PDO wines / Label Rouge for the Lentille verte du Berry, Home and building equipment: Balsan, France Parquet Production Innovation (FPPI), AMCC, Beirens... Logistics and transport, national platforms with notably the Vivarte group. Establishment or maintenance of large companies: Louis Vuitton (leather goods and luggage), Bodin Joyeux and Maroquinerie Rioland (high-end leather goods)
Sport: La Berrichonne Football in Chateauroux, Basketball; National 1 and National 3 teams at Le Poinçonnet, CNTS Shooting Club, Maison départementale des sports. The leisure centres of Ligny, Eguzon and the Bellebouche lake and the Belle-Isle lake offer water sports and leisure activities.
Websites: www.indre.fr / www.berryprovince.com / www.indreberry.fr / https://www.facebook.com/IndreenBerry/ / Twitter @Indre36 / https://www.instagram.com/indre36/

Indre in Berry, a natural department!
Located in the centre of France, in the heart of Berry, the department of Indre, through which flows the river that gives it its name, provides a gradual transition from the Loire Valley to the foothills of the Massif Central.
Indre has a preserved environment, a rich past, land and perpetuated traditions that enchant its visitors. Peaceful and wild, medieval and romantic, a land of nuances and contrasts, Indre remains an endearing, often secretive country. With more than 80 Romanesque churches, 100 castles and houses from the medieval period, thousands of kilometres of signposted footpaths, a regional nature park..., let yourself be guided on this quick stroll through the 6 landscapes of the Indre.
The Pays de Valençay - Boischaut Nord: a land of hedged farmland bordering Touraine, which experienced the splendours of Napoleonic diplomacy, around the sumptuous castle of the Prince of Talleyrand in Valençay (Renaissance). With Bouges (18th century - replica of the Petit Trianon) and Argy, it forms the "golden triangle" of the department's castles. A fine goat's cheese with the appearance of a pyramid, and a vineyard crown Valençay with a double AOC.
The Issoudun and Champagne Berrichonne region: the large cereal plains of the Champagne Berrichonne region hide a few treasures: the light and fruity wines of Reuilly (AOC), the green lentils of Berry and the former royal town of Issoudun with its magnificent Saint-Roch hospice or its Tour Blanche.
The La Châtre en Berry region: the spirit of romance has been blowing through this peaceful bocage country in the south of the Indre since the 19th century. In Nohant, George Sand lived and received Balzac, Chopin, Delacroix, Liszt, Flaubert.
The Val de Creuse - Val d'Anglin region: from Crozant to Tournon-Saint-Martin, spectacular landscapes that inspired great impressionists such as Monet and Guillaumin. Here, outdoor leisure activities reign around the Anglin, the Creuse or the Éguzon lake (300 ha).
The Brenne regional nature park: it is known as the land of a thousand ponds. Hunting, fish farming and pond fishing, and extensive livestock farming continue to keep the Brenne alive. It is also a paradise for lovers of ornithology, fauna and flora: orchids, dragonflies, migratory birds, and even a small freshwater turtle, the cistude.
The Castelroussin - Val de l'Indre region: Châteauroux, a green, dynamic, lively city with a preserved heritage, a city on a human scale.

Km 114

Km 114: Valençay (Pop: 2,400)
The town, marked by the strong personality of Talleyrand, who is buried here and to whom a museum is dedicated in the sumptuous castle he lived in, is also known for its pyramid-shaped ashy goat's cheese made from raw milk from Berry. The story goes that the cheese does not form a complete pyramid because it was served to Napoleon and Talleyrand demanded that the top part be cut off so as not to remind his host of his defeats in the Egyptian campaign. Valençay is also an AOC wine that produces reds (Gamay) and whites (Sauvignon). Among the famous producers of this wine is the journalist and former president of the Paris Saint-Germain and Châteauroux football clubs Michel Denisot.

Château de Valençay
Foundation: 10th century
Style: Renaissance
Characteristics: an architectural gem, remarkably well preserved, with a superb Renaissance keep, an Italian arcade, a classical-style wing and corner towers with domed roofs.
Special feature: former residence of Prince Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand (1754-1838), Minister of Foreign Affairs under the Consulate. Napoleon Bonaparte contributed to it by adding certain instructions: "I want you to have a beautiful land, that you receive the diplomatic corps and important foreigners there brilliantly".
Current use: as a place for visits, exhibitions and various cultural events.
Classification: Historical Monument in 2011 / Listed as one of the 22 great sites of the Loire Valley.

Km 137

Km 137: Levroux (Pop: 2,900)
Medieval town. Notable for its St. Sylvain collegiate church, listed in 1840. The collegiate church dates from the late Romanesque and early Gothic periods (13th century). Note its superb organ case (1502), its classified stalls from the end of the 15th century and its polychrome wooden statues from the 16th century.
The Champagne Gate is the other outstanding monument of the town: built in 1436 to protect the inhabitants of the town from wars and brigands. Above the gate, the grooves in which the arms of the drawbridge were embedded have been preserved. Today, this building marks the separation between the medieval and modern parts of the town.
In 2018, Levroux was the finish of a stage of the Tour de l'Avenir won by Matthew Gibson.

Km 152

Km 152: Déols (Pop: 7,560)
North of Châteauroux, in Déols, stands a bell tower as the only vestige of ancient times. Its foundation dates back to 917 AD. A man in the entourage of the Duke of Aquitaine, Ebbes de Bourges, known as le Noble, the great of Berry, founded a feudal house and, on the same model as that of Cluny, an abbey: the abbey of Notre-Dame-St-Pierre-St-Paul. It became one of the most important abbeys of its time, both in terms of its architecture and its influence. Its seven bell towers and its remarkable size (the abbey church is 113-metres long) attracted the vocations of nearly 200 monks. Despite the power of the abbey, a succession of events such as the Hundred Years' War and the Wars of Religion led to its ruin. Its destruction was accentuated in the 17th century when the lord of the time transformed it into a stone quarry. All that remains today of the grandeur of this abbey is one of the bell towers, 42-metres high, accessible in the summer, from which the view is breathtaking. You can also admire some remains of the church and the cloister as well as a remarkable collection of Romanesque capitals in the René Pécherat museum. Déols Abbey is listed as a Cluniac site in Europe.
From the top of the bell tower, you can discover the other treasures of the Déols heritage: the doors of the Pont Perrin and the clock, the tombs of Saint-Ludre and Saint-Léocade.

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