Tourist attractions

Verviers / Longwy

Longwy

Longwy

The city was fortified by Vauban which is one of the reasons it is ranked amongst the UNESCO world heritage. The construction of the ramparts came far before the first visit of the Tour to Longwy back in  1911. While a large part of Alsace-Lorraine was then attached to the German Empire, the area was among the few sectors that remained French after the territorial division decided by the Frankfurt treaty in 1871. Four stage finishes were judged there in that context until 1914. The last visit was back in 1982 when Belgian Daniel Willems captured the win.

Porte de France and ramparts, Longwy © Mairie de Longwy

5 previous stages
Chef-lieu de canton in Meurthe-et-Moselle (54)

Population: 15,000

Specialities: potée Lorraine (stew), Mirabelle, enamel and faience of Longwy

Economy: 700 companies, Longwy enamel manufacture, Pole Europe (commercial hub),  Henri Poincaré Polytechnic.

Sport: Basket Club Longwy-Rehon (National 2), Pays-Haut Handball, USB Longwy (football), Judo Club Bassin de Longwy, Karaté-Do Longwy, Pays Haut Athlétisme Réuni (athletics), Union cycliste du Bassin de Longwy, Entente Cycliste de la Région Européenne de Longwy. Events: Fête du Sport, Semi-marathon.

Heritage: citadel (17th century), old castle site (11th to 17th centuries), St Dagobert  church (17th century), Holy Trinity Church (19th century), Porte des Carmes (17th century gate), Viaduct of La Chiers (20th century)

Festivals: Venetian Carnival, Street Arts Festival, Musique en Liberté (Music in liberty), Longwy la nuit (Longwy by night), Salon des Métiers d'Art (Arts and Crafts Fair), Vauban en Lumière

Labels: a UNESCO world heritage site as part of the network of towns fortified by Vauban; Longwy enamel listed as a French immaterial cultural heritage. Ville et Métiers d'Art ; Ville-Santé (Healthy City).

Web sites

Longwy and cycling

The town was fortified by Vauban and as such became a world heritage site. The building of the rampart took place long before the Tour's first visit in 1911 and while most of Alsace and Lorraine still belonged to Germany at the time, Longwy was one of the few sectors to remain French thanks to the 1871 Treaty of Frankfurt. For stage finishes took place in this context until 1914. This last stage, won by Luxembourg's Francois Faber, finished in awkward fashion. Tenth overall, Faber was not threat to GC leader Philippe Thys and he received the go-ahead to break clear. The 1909 Tour champion reached Longwy six minutes ahead of the bunch but struggled to get off his bike as he has been drinking brandy for most of his breakaway attempt and was seriously inebriated. The Tour last came to Longwy in1982 for a stage win by Belgium's Daniel Willems, who finishes on his own and also won the penultimate stage of the same edition in Aulnay-sous-bois.

1982 Serge Demierre et Daniel Willems étape 3 134 km © Presse Sports1913 Thys (Philippe) vient de faire une chute dans la côte de Grosse-Pierre © Presse Sports

5 previous stages
Chef-lieu de canton in Meurthe-et-Moselle (54)

Population: 15,000

Specialities: potée Lorraine (stew), Mirabelle, enamel and faience of Longwy

Economy: 700 companies, Longwy enamel manufacture, Pole Europe (commercial hub),  Henri Poincaré Polytechnic.

Sport: Basket Club Longwy-Rehon (National 2), Pays-Haut Handball, USB Longwy (football), Judo Club Bassin de Longwy, Karaté-Do Longwy, Pays Haut Athlétisme Réuni (athletics), Union cycliste du Bassin de Longwy, Entente Cycliste de la Région Européenne de Longwy. Events: Fête du Sport, Semi-marathon.

Heritage: citadel (17th century), old castle site (11th to 17th centuries), St Dagobert  church (17th century), Holy Trinity Church (19th century), Porte des Carmes (17th century gate), Viaduct of La Chiers (20th century)

Festivals: Venetian Carnival, Street Arts Festival, Musique en Liberté (Music in liberty), Longwy la nuit (Longwy by night), Salon des Métiers d'Art (Arts and Crafts Fair), Vauban en Lumière

Labels: a UNESCO world heritage site as part of the network of towns fortified by Vauban; Longwy enamel listed as a French immaterial cultural heritage. Ville et Métiers d'Art ; Ville-Santé (Healthy City).

Web sites

Sights

Vauban fortress (UNESCO World Heritage)
When Longwy became French after the Treaty of Nijmegen in 1679, Louis XIV decided to destroy the medieval part of the city to build a new town as an important stronghold on the northeastern border of the kingdom. Vauban's main talent was his ability to adapt the design of the fortress to the slope on a ridge overlooking the Chiers valley and the lower part of town. The citadel was built around a hexagonal plan, with six strongholds, and equipped with all the facilities required by such an important war compound (church, arsenal, pits and barracks). It also reveals Vauban's idea of an ideal city. A monumental gate and four strongholds were preserved. Two of them contain cross-shaped storage houses, exceptional in Vauban's works.

The old castle
Located between the top and bottom parts of the town, the site is now a green area in the heart of the city. Ideal for a walk amidst orchards and an arboretum, its soil also holds the remains of Longwy's medieval heritage. Every Saturday morning, volunteers from the Castelvicus association take visitors around the excavation site and the restoration works on the walls and towers of the old town. Dating from the 9th century, the site comprised a village, a keep and a marketplace, all taken down under Louis XIV when he built the upper town. The keep was replaced by a fort in the 18th century and in the 19th century by a network of blockhouses.

St Dagobert Church
The St Dagobert Church was built in the same time as the new town of Longwy between 1683 and 1690 and paid on King Louis XIV's personal purse. It was exceptional by the height of its tower, which lost its third floor during the 1870-1871 war with Prussia. The church is home to a splendid organ restored in 2004.

The tourism office
It is installed in one of the five wells bringing water to the Vauban citadel. The large well on Place d'Armes was the only one accessible to civilians. Sixty-metres deep and 12 metres wide, it was operated by a big wheel in which 12 men were walking.

Enamel and faience museum
Faience started in Longwy in 1798 when a manufacture replaced a Carmelite convent sold during the French Revolution. Boosted by orders from Napoleon Bonaparte, who visited the site, the faience industry thrived and was completed from1865 by a new process to produce enamel.

Château de Cons La Grandville
It is one of the most beautifully preserved buildings in the Longwy area. The 11th century castle, nestled in a curve of the Chiers river, was rebuilt in the Renaissance style in 1572. It is typical of the Renaissance style of Lorraine.

Mont Saint Martin Romanesque church
At the top of a hill overlooking the valleys of Chiers and Messancy, the Mount St Martin Romanesque church was built on the site of one of the oldest proto-Christian chapels of Lorraine. Rebuilt in the 11th century, the building is displayed in the shape of a basilica.

Le château de Cons La Grandville - Vue sur le château © Michel TeitenEglise prieure Mont St Martin © AimelaimeÉglise Saint Dagobert - Façade de l’Église © AimelaimeMusée, émaux et faïenceries - Mise en lumière du bâtiment à l'occasion de la Nuit des Musées 2012 © LongwyMusée, émaux et faïenceries - Vue de l’intérieur du musée © Ville de Longwy - KevinPuits de Siège © NcomissVue de la forteresse Vauban © Ville de Longwy – office du tourisme

5 previous stages
Chef-lieu de canton in Meurthe-et-Moselle (54)

Population: 15,000

Specialities: potée Lorraine (stew), Mirabelle, enamel and faience of Longwy

Economy: 700 companies, Longwy enamel manufacture, Pole Europe (commercial hub),  Henri Poincaré Polytechnic.

Sport: Basket Club Longwy-Rehon (National 2), Pays-Haut Handball, USB Longwy (football), Judo Club Bassin de Longwy, Karaté-Do Longwy, Pays Haut Athlétisme Réuni (athletics), Union cycliste du Bassin de Longwy, Entente Cycliste de la Région Européenne de Longwy. Events: Fête du Sport, Semi-marathon.

Heritage: citadel (17th century), old castle site (11th to 17th centuries), St Dagobert  church (17th century), Holy Trinity Church (19th century), Porte des Carmes (17th century gate), Viaduct of La Chiers (20th century)

Festivals: Venetian Carnival, Street Arts Festival, Musique en Liberté (Music in liberty), Longwy la nuit (Longwy by night), Salon des Métiers d'Art (Arts and Crafts Fair), Vauban en Lumière

Labels: a UNESCO world heritage site as part of the network of towns fortified by Vauban; Longwy enamel listed as a French immaterial cultural heritage. Ville et Métiers d'Art ; Ville-Santé (Healthy City).

Web sites

Fagnes de Malchamps et de Stoumont

Tapis de linaigrettes à feuilles étroites au sein d’une tourbière de transition © AnnickVue sur les landes depuis la tour panoramique près du Domaine de Bérinzenne © Philippe

The landscapes of the Fagnes de Malchamps and Stoumont Natura 2000 site stretch as far as the eye can see. They shelter vast heaths and bogs interspersed here and there with birch and oak woods. In the dry moors, you will find blueberries and Calluna vulgaris, commonly known as heather. In places, the layer of peat moss is so thick that you will find typical peat plants there.

These patchwork Natura 2000 habitats are a real refuge for some rare birds, dragonflies and butterflies!

Read more : www.afbiodiversite.fr/fr/stage-3-verviers-longwy

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