Caption
  • Leaders
  • Caravan
  • Start town
  • Finish town
  • Feeding zone
  • Checkpoints
  • Sprint
  • Last kilometre
  • Hors catégorie climb
  • Points of interest
  • Cobblestones sectors

On the road

Pas de Calais (62)

Population: 1,461,387 (2010)
Prefecture: Arras
Sub-préfectures: Bethune, Boulogne-sur-Mer, Calais, Lens, Montreuil, Saint-Omer
Region: Nord-Pas-de-Calais
Surface: 6 670 km2  
Largest town: Calais (74,000)
Economy: ports, fishing, agriculture, tourism.
Specialties: beer, ratte du Touquet, mussles, herring, waterzooi.
Tourism: seaside, Cote d'Opale, Le Louvre-Lens, belfries, Arras squares, monuments of WWI.

Nord (59)

Population: 2,576,770 (2010)
Prefecture: Lille
Sub-prefectures: Avesnes-sur-Helpe, Cambrai, Douai, Dunkirk, Valenciennes
Region: Nord-Pas-de-Calais
Surface: 5 743 km2
Largest town: Lille (pop: 227,000)
Economy: mines, textile, metallurgy, sale, department stores, tourism, administration.
Specialties: beer (Jeanlain, Trois-Monts, Pelican), cheese (Maroilles, Vieux Lille, boulette d'Avesnes), chicory, chicons, bêtises de Cambrai (sweets).
Tourism: belfries, mining heritage, grande braderie in Lille, carnivals.

Km 18 : Montreuil-sur-Mer

Population: 2,300

Once the only sea-port in the Capetian Kingdom, Montreuil lies nowadays 10 kms away from the sea but has retained its citadel with its rampart and the two tower of the medieval castle in which Queen Bertha was jailed. A part of Victor Hugo's Les Miserables takes place in Montreuil.

Nord-Pas-de-Calais

Population: 1,461,387 (2010)
Prefecture: Arras
Sub-préfectures: Bethune, Boulogne-sur-Mer, Calais, Lens, Montreuil, Saint-Omer
Region: Nord-Pas-de-Calais
Surface: 6 670 km2  
Largest town: Calais (74,000)
Economy: ports, fishing, agriculture, tourism.
Specialties: beer, ratte du Touquet, mussles, herring, waterzooi.
Tourism: seaside, Cote d'Opale, Le Louvre-Lens, belfries, Arras squares, monuments of WWI.

Tour de France of the Monuments Nationaux

Villa Cavrois in Croix

Villa Cavrois © Centre des Monuments NationauxVilla Cavrois © Centre des Monuments NationauxVilla Cavrois © Centre des Monuments Nationaux

The Villa Cavrois is one of the later works by the architect Robert Mallet-Stevens, and it was designed and built in Croix between 1929 and 1932 for Paul Cavrois, a textile industrialist from Roubaix, and his wife Lucie Cavrois and their seven children.
The architect sketched his initial drawings for a total art work in 1929, and it was devised as a manifesto for his aesthetic and technical preoccupations. The villa was completed in 1932. It brings together all the most advanced technologies of the period and was something of an aesthetic shock - and it still is a shock for many people today.
In its choice of material, outer appearance, inner comforts, and decorative vocabulary the Villa adopts a resolutely modern stance. Yet in its spatial layout and overall design, it is a reworking of the model of a "country residence". Its proportions are imposing – being nearly 60 metres long, with 3000 square metres of living space including nearly 1000 square metres of terraces – and it is laid out symmetrically along axes in accordance with the principles characteristic of 17th-century châteaux. The Villa Cavrois is a rare example in European domestic architecture of a total commission as, in addition to the building, Mallet-Stevens also designed the inner fittings, the furniture and the gardens. It is now considered one of the most famous 20th-century architect-built houses in the world.
During the Second World War it was occupied by the German Army, who filled in the water mirror. It was lived in by the family up until 1986, and then sold in 1987 to a neighbouring property developer who wanted to demolish it. After undergoing serious damage in the 1990s it seemed destined to disappear. But a group of enthusiasts banded together in 1989 and set up an association to safeguard the building, managing to get it listed as a historic moment in 1990. In 2001, after many years of uncertainty, the state decided to buy the property when it was in a perilous state, and to restore it to its original 1932 condition.


In spring 2015 all of the Villa and its gardens will be opened to visitors by the Centre des monuments nationaux. The ticket office and gift shop will be housed in the former keeper's house and will have various books for sale, including works about the Villa Cavrois published by the Editions du patrimoine.

Visitor information

Centre des monuments nationaux - Villa Cavrois
Avenue John-Fitzgerald Kennedy
59170 Croix
Tel. O3.20.73.47.12
http://www.villa-cavrois.monuments-nationaux.fr/

Voir la fiche

Jersey wearers after the stage 21

Classifications after the stage 21

Sponsorship and Environment

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